[object Object]
Flower BPM

The 25 most relevant Business Processes

The 25 most relevant Business Processes

Processes are the connecting arteries of an organization's circulatory system. While a well-oiled process is what keeps a company alive, a stagnant workflow can have a significant impact on the quality of the product. Structurally sound and transparent processes are appreciated by both employees and managers.

At a time when the western world is facing a shortage of skilled labor, it is becoming increasingly important for a company to be well organized in order to stand out from the crowd.

As a result, **automated processes **in many areas of a business are almost indispensable.

But how do you identify which processes are relevant to your business?

In the following you will find a list of the 25 most searched for processes on the web, sorted by departments, number of roles, activities, running time and instances. Including descriptions of all possible process tasks and key roles.

Identify the processes that are relevant to you, use the models that are already in place and get quickly started on your way to a perfectly functioning company structure or accelerate your smooth processes!

1. Development Process

The development department is the heart of any creative company, like** software development, consulting, the automotive, construction** or** engineering industry** among others.

A smooth development process helps the organization to grow and improve. It is the continuous process of creating new strategies, products or services in response to the changing needs of the market or the organization.

Flower Configuration guide

/* IMAGE here */

Main tasks of the Development Process

  1. Idea Generation: The first stage of development is idea generation. This stage involves brainstorming sessions, market research, and identifying new opportunities. The idea generation stage is essential because it sets the foundation for the rest of the development process.
  2. Concept Development: The concept development stage is where the ideas generated in the previous stage are refined and developed into more detailed concepts. This stage involves evaluating the feasibility of the ideas, determining the potential market, and developing a plan for implementing the ideas.
  3. Design: The design stage is where the concepts developed in the previous stage are turned into actual products, services, or strategies. This stage involves designing the product or service, creating a prototype, and testing the prototype to ensure that it meets the needs of the market or the organization.
  4. Testing: The testing stage is where the product or service is tested to ensure that it meets the desired quality standards. This stage involves conducting user tests, market tests, and performance tests to ensure that the product or service is ready for launch.
  5. Launch: The launch stage is where the product or service is introduced to the market. This stage involves creating a marketing plan, establishing distribution channels, and launching the product or service to the market.

Key roles in the Development Process

  1. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for overseeing the development process and ensuring that the project is completed on time, within budget, and to the desired quality standards. They are responsible for managing the development team, monitoring progress, and ensuring that the project meets the goals of the organization.
  2. Development Team Members: The development team members are responsible for carrying out the tasks associated with the development process. They may include designers, engineers, marketing specialists, and product managers.
  3. Quality Assurance Manager: The quality assurance manager is responsible for ensuring that the product or service meets the desired quality standards. They are responsible for developing quality control procedures, testing the product or service, and implementing corrective actions when necessary.
  4. Marketing Manager: The marketing manager is responsible for creating a marketing plan and promoting the product or service to the market. They are responsible for developing marketing materials, establishing distribution channels, and monitoring the success of the marketing campaign.

Relevant for:

Electronics

Automotive

Information Technology

Process Management

2. Scrum

Scrum is one of the methods used in the development process.

Scrum is an agile project management framework that helps teams deliver high-quality products by emphasizing collaboration, flexibility, and continuous improvement. It is widely used in software development but can also be applied to other industries.

The Scrum process consists of a series of iterations called sprints. Each sprint typically lasts between one and four weeks, and during each sprint, the team completes a set of tasks that contribute to the overall goal of the project.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Scrum Process

  1. Product Backlog Creation: The first step in the Scrum process is to create a product backlog, which is a prioritized list of features, requirements, and tasks that need to be completed for the project. The product backlog is owned by the Product Owner.
  2. Sprint Planning: The team, including the Product Owner, Scrum Master, and Development Team, meets to plan the upcoming sprint. During this meeting, the team decides on the tasks to be completed during the sprint and creates a Sprint Backlog.
  3. Daily Stand-up: The team meets daily for a 15-minute stand-up meeting to discuss progress, challenges, and plans for the day. The Scrum Master facilitates the meeting and ensures that it stays on track.
  4. Sprint Review: At the end of each sprint, the team conducts a Sprint Review to demonstrate the completed work to the Product Owner and other stakeholders. The team also receives feedback and identifies areas for improvement.
  5. Sprint Retrospective: After the Sprint Review, the team conducts a Sprint Retrospective to reflect on the sprint and identify opportunities for improvement in the next sprint.

Roles in Scrum

  1. Product Owner: The Product Owner is responsible for creating and maintaining the product backlog, defining product requirements, and ensuring that the product meets the needs of the stakeholders. They work closely with the Scrum Master and the Development Team to prioritize tasks and provide feedback on completed work.
  2. Scrum Master: The Scrum Master is responsible for ensuring that the Scrum process is followed correctly and that the team has the resources and support they need to complete the work. They facilitate daily stand-up meetings, sprint planning, sprint review, and sprint retrospective meetings. The Scrum Master also helps the team identify and address any obstacles or challenges that may arise during the sprint.
  3. Development Team: The Development Team is responsible for completing the tasks outlined in the Sprint Backlog. The team is self-organizing and cross-functional, meaning that each member has a unique skill set and can take on different tasks during the sprint. The Development Team works collaboratively with the Product Owner and the Scrum Master to ensure that the work is completed on time and to the required quality standards.

Relevant for:

Software developement

3. Kanban

Kanban is a popular development process management method that emphasizes continuous improvement and flexibility. It originated in Japan and has gained widespread adoption across industries worldwide. It is a lean approach to project management that focuses on improving workflow efficiency, reducing waste, and increasing customer satisfaction. Kanban's flexibility and adaptability make it an ideal choice for teams looking to improve their development processes continuously.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Kanban Process

  1. Visualize the Workflow:

    The first step in implementing Kanban as a development process is to visualize the workflow. This involves creating a Kanban board that displays the status of tasks, such as To-Do, In Progress, and Done. The board should provide transparency, clarity, and shared understanding among team members.

  2. Define Work Items:

    The second step in implementing Kanban is to define work items. This involves breaking down the development process into smaller, manageable tasks. Each task should be clearly defined, and its priority should be established.

  3. Establish Work in Progress (WIP) Limits

The third step in implementing Kanban is to establish work in progress (WIP) limits. This involves limiting the number of tasks that can be in progress simultaneously. This helps the team to focus on completing tasks one at a time and improving workflow predictability.

  1. Implement Pull-Based Workflow

The fourth step in implementing Kanban is to implement a pull-based workflow. This means that team members should pull tasks from the backlog only when they have capacity to work on them. This helps to avoid overloading team members and reducing multitasking.

  1. Manage Flow

The fifth step in implementing Kanban is to manage flow. This involves identifying and resolving any obstacles or bottlenecks that may hinder the flow of work. The team should continuously monitor the workflow and make adjustments to maintain a smooth and continuous flow of work.

  1. Implement Feedback Loops

The final step in implementing Kanban is to implement feedback loops. This involves continuously monitoring and improving the workflow. The team should gather feedback from customers and team members and make adjustments to improve the development process continuously.

Roles in Kanban

  1. Product Owner: The product owner is responsible for defining the product backlog, prioritizing tasks, and ensuring that the team is working on the most valuable tasks.
  2. Development Team: The development team is responsible for implementing the tasks in the product backlog.
  3. Scrum Master: The scrum master is responsible for ensuring that the team follows the Kanban process and continuously improves the development process.
  4. Stakeholders: Stakeholders are involved in providing feedback on the development process and ensuring that the product meets their needs.

4. Change Management Process

Never change a running horse! What if it runs, but not fast enough?

Every organization needs changes, regardless which industry. Sometimes you don't have to change the whole horse, maybe you just need to re-band the legs or braid the mane.

Change management is nothing more than the improvement of a company's processes, the introduction of new elements and the removal of unnecessary ones.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

The ITIL Change Management process for software companies is used as an example of this.

The ITIL Process of Change Management aims to control the lifecycle of all Changes. The primary objective of this process is to enable beneficial Changes to be made, with minimum disruption to IT services.

Main tasks of the Change Management Process in ITIL

  1. Change Management Support
    To provide templates and guidance for the authorization of Changes, and to supply the other IT Service Management processes with information on planned and ongoing Changes.
  2. Assessment of Change Proposals
    To assess Change Proposals which are typically submitted for significant Changes by Service Strategy. The purpose of assessing Change Proposals is to identify possible issues prior to the start of design activities.
  3. RFC Logging and Review
    To filter out Requests of Change which do not contain all information required for assessment or which are deemed impractical.
  4. Assessment and Implementation of Emergency Changes
    Objective: To assess, authorize and implement an Emergency Change as quickly as possible. This process is invoked if normal Change Management procedures cannot be applied because an emergency requires immediate action.
  5. Change Assessment by the Change Manager
    To determine the required level of authorization for the assessment of a proposed Change. Significant Changes are passed on to the CAB for assessment, while minor Changes are immediately assessed and authorized by the Change Manager.
  6. Change Assessment by the CAB
    To assess a proposed Change and authorize the Change planning phase. If required, higher levels of authority (e.g. IT Management) are involved in the authorization process.
  7. Change Scheduling and Build Authorization
    To authorize detailed Change and Release planning, and to assess the resulting Project Plan prior to authorizing the Change Build phase.
  8. Change Deployment Authorization
    To assess if all required Change components have been built and properly tested, and to authorize the Change Deployment phase.
  9. Minor Change Deployment
    To implement low-risk, well-understood Changes which do not require the involvement of Release Management.
  10. Post Implementation Review and Change Closure
    To assess the course of the Change implementation and the achieved results, in order to verify that a complete history of activities is present for future reference, and to make sure that any mistakes are analyzed and lessons learned.

Key Roles in the ITIL Change Management Process

  1. Change Manager: The change manager is responsible for planning and executing the change initiative. This includes developing the change management plan, coordinating the change activities, communicating with stakeholders, and monitoring progress.
  2. Project Team: The project team is responsible for implementing the changes identified in the change management plan. This may include individuals from different departments or functional areas, depending on the scope of the change initiative.
  3. Change Agents: Change agents are individuals within the organization who have the knowledge, skills, and influence to drive change at the grassroots level. They may include front-line employees, supervisors, and managers who can help to communicate the benefits of the change and support the implementation process.
  4. Stakeholders: Stakeholders are individuals or groups who are impacted by the change initiative. This may include employees, customers, suppliers, and other external stakeholders. It is important to engage stakeholders throughout the change management process to ensure that their concerns and perspectives are taken into account.
  5. Communication Specialists: Communication specialists are responsible for developing and delivering communication strategies that help to keep stakeholders informed about the change initiative. This may include creating newsletters, presentations, and other communication materials, as well as managing feedback and addressing concerns.
  6. Training Specialists: Training specialists are responsible for developing and delivering training programs that help employees to develop the skills and knowledge needed to support the change initiative. This may include creating training materials, delivering training sessions, and providing ongoing support and coaching.

Relevant for:

Consulting

Process management

Software develpment

Automotive

5. Change request

Change request is a process used by organizations to manage requests for changes to a project, product, or service. Change requests can be initiated by various stakeholders, such as customers, employees, or vendors, and they can include modifications to any aspect of the project, such as scope, budget, schedule, or quality. Effective change request management is essential to ensure that changes are made in a timely and controlled manner, without compromising the project objectives or performance.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key steps of the Change Request Process

  1. Initiation: The first step in the change request process is to initiate the request. This can be done by filling out a change request form or by submitting a written request. The request should include a description of the change, the reason for the change, and the expected impact on the project.
  2. Evaluation: Once the change request has been initiated, the next step is to evaluate the request. This involves reviewing the request and determining whether it is feasible, necessary, and aligned with the project objectives. The evaluation should also consider the potential risks, costs, and benefits of the change.
  3. Approval: If the change request is deemed feasible and necessary, the next step is to obtain approval. This involves obtaining the necessary approvals from stakeholders, such as the project manager, the sponsor, or the customer. The approval should also include any necessary changes to the project plan, budget, or schedule.
  4. Implementation: After the change request has been approved, the next step is to implement the change. This involves communicating the change to all stakeholders, updating the project plan, and making any necessary changes to the project deliverables. The implementation should also include testing and verification to ensure that the change has been successfully implemented.
  5. Closure: Once the change has been implemented, the final step in the change request process is to close the request. This involves documenting the change, updating the project documentation, and archiving the request. The closure should also include a review of the change request process to identify any opportunities for improvement.

Key roles involved in Change Request Process

  1. Change Requester: The change requester is responsible for initiating the change request and providing the necessary information and justification for the change.
  2. Change Manager: The change manager is responsible for managing the change request process, including evaluating, approving, and implementing changes.
  3. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for ensuring that the changes are aligned with the project objectives, and for updating the project plan, budget, or schedule as needed.
  4. Stakeholders: The stakeholders are responsible for providing input and feedback on the change request, and for approving the changes as needed.

Relevant for:

Consulting

Process management

Software develpment

Automotive

6. Onboarding

An HR department is an employer's advertisement. Effective procedures in all HR processes ensure that employees feel cared for and their interests are represented.

Onboarding is the process by which an organization welcomes and integrates new employees into their workplace. It is an essential aspect of any business, as it sets the tone for the employee's experience and sets them up for success.

Proper onboarding can increase productivity, reduce turnover, and create a positive work environment.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key Elements of an effective Onboarding Process

  1. Pre-boarding: Before an employee starts their first day of work, they should receive information about the company's culture, values, and expectations. This can include an employee handbook, an introduction to their team and supervisor, and a clear outline of their job responsibilities.
  2. Orientation: On the employee's first day, they should be given a tour of the workplace, introduced to their coworkers, and given an overview of the company's mission, goals, and values. This is also a good time to provide them with any necessary equipment, such as a computer, phone, or security badge.
  3. Training: New employees should receive training on their job duties, as well as any company policies, procedures, or software they will be using. This training can be provided through formal classes, online courses, or on-the-job training.
  4. Support: Throughout the onboarding process, new employees should have access to a support system, such as a mentor or HR representative, who can answer their questions and provide guidance. This support can help them feel more comfortable in their new role and reduce any anxiety they may have.

Key roles involved in the Onboarding Process

  1. HR: The HR team is responsible for creating and implementing the onboarding program, which includes setting up the new employee's paperwork, scheduling orientation and training, and providing access to company resources and support.
  2. Manager/Supervisor: The new employee's manager or supervisor plays a critical role in the onboarding process. They are responsible for providing the new employee with a clear understanding of their job responsibilities and expectations, assigning tasks, and providing ongoing support and feedback.
  3. Mentor/Buddy: A mentor or buddy is often assigned to new employees to help them adjust to their new role and workplace. They provide guidance, answer questions, and help the new employee navigate company culture and policies.
  4. IT: The IT department is responsible for setting up the new employee's computer, phone, and other necessary technology. They also provide training on company software and systems.
  5. Facilities/Operations: The facilities or operations team is responsible for providing the new employee with access to the workplace, including keys, badges, and other necessary items. They also ensure the new employee has a workspace set up and any necessary equipment.
  6. Legal/Compliance: The legal or compliance team ensures that the new employee is compliant with any legal or regulatory requirements. They may conduct background checks or ensure that the new employee completes required training on topics such as ethics or data privacy.
  7. Other Employees: All employees in the organization play a role in the onboarding process, from introducing themselves and welcoming the new employee to providing guidance and support as needed.

Relevant for:

HR

7. Offboarding

An HR department is an employer's advertisement. Effective procedures in all HR processes ensure that employees feel cared for and their interests are represented.

Even Offboarding is a process that is often overlooked by many organizations. The external impact and indirect publicity should not be underestimated when a company dismisses an employee with appreciation and without tension. It involves the necessary steps that are taken when an employee leaves a company, whether it be through resignation, retirement, termination or any other reason.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Offboarding Process

  1. Exit Interview: The first step in the offboarding process is to conduct an exit interview with the departing employee. The exit interview provides an opportunity for the organization to gather feedback from the employee on their experience working with the organization.
  2. Collect Company Property: The next step is to collect all company property from the departing employee. This includes company laptops, cell phones, access cards, keys, and any other company-owned equipment or documents.
  3. Remove Access: It is important to revoke the departing employee's access to all company systems, applications, and resources. This includes email, network access, and any other systems that they had access to during their employment.
  4. Notify Third Parties: If the departing employee had access to any third-party systems or applications, it is important to notify those third parties to terminate access.
  5. Notify Colleagues: The organization should notify the departing employee's colleagues about their departure and make arrangements to transfer their responsibilities to other employees.

Roles in Offboarding

  1. Human Resources: The HR department plays a critical role in offboarding. They are responsible for coordinating the exit interview, collecting company property, revoking access, and notifying colleagues.
  2. IT Department: The IT department is responsible for revoking access to all company systems, applications, and resources.
  3. Managers: The departing employee's manager is responsible for notifying their colleagues and making arrangements to transfer their responsibilities to other employees.
  4. Legal Department: The legal department is responsible for ensuring that all legal requirements are met during the offboarding process, such as complying with data protection regulations.

Relevant for

HR

8. Sales Process /B2B Sales process

The sale keeps the company alive as a feeding hand. It is responsible for generating revenue and driving growth. However, the process of selling involves more than just convincing customers to purchase a product or service. It requires a structured approach that encompasses a range of activities and roles.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key steps of the Sales Process

  1. Prospecting: The first step in the sales process is to identify potential customers who may be interested in the product or service. This can be done through various methods, including referrals, advertising, and networking.
  2. Qualifying: Once prospects have been identified, the next step is to qualify them to ensure that they are a good fit for the product or service. This involves assessing their needs, budget, and decision-making process.
  3. Presenting: Once a prospect has been qualified, the salesperson will present the product or service to them. This may involve a demo, presentation, or other methods of showcasing the product or service's features and benefits.
  4. Addressing Objections: During the presentation stage, the salesperson may encounter objections from the prospect. It is essential to address these objections and provide solutions that will address the prospect's concerns.
  5. Closing: Once the prospect is convinced that the product or service is a good fit, the salesperson will move to the closing stage. This involves asking for the sale and negotiating terms such as price, delivery, and payment.
  6. Follow-Up: After the sale has been made, the salesperson will follow up with the customer to ensure their satisfaction and address any issues that may arise. This helps to build long-term relationships with customers and increase the chances of repeat business.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key roles involved in the Sales Process

  1. Sales Representatives: The sales representative is responsible for driving the sales process from start to finish. They are responsible for identifying potential customers, qualifying them, presenting the product or service, closing the sale, and following up.
  2. Sales Managers: The sales manager is responsible for overseeing the sales team and ensuring that they are meeting their targets. They are responsible for setting goals, providing training and support, and managing the sales process.
  3. Marketing Team: The marketing team is responsible for generating leads and creating awareness of the product or service. They work closely with the sales team to ensure that they have a steady stream of qualified leads to work with.
  4. Customer Service: The customer service team is responsible for providing support to customers after the sale has been made. They address any issues that may arise and help to build long-term relationships with customers.

Relevant for

Work management

Consulting

Service management

Sales

9. Manufacturing Process

There is no selling without creating. A smooth production process is essential, especially in manufacturing companies.

Manufacturing is the process of converting raw materials or components into finished products that can be sold to customers.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main tasks of the Manufacturing Process

  1. Design: The design stage is where the product is conceptualized and the specifications are established. This stage involves research and development, product design, and prototyping. The design stage is essential because it sets the foundation for the rest of the manufacturing process.
  2. Production: The production stage is where the product is actually manufactured. This stage involves several steps, including material procurement, assembly, and testing. The production stage is where most of the time and resources are spent during the manufacturing process.
  3. Quality Control: The quality control stage is where the product is inspected and tested to ensure that it meets the specified quality standards. This stage involves several steps, including quality inspections, product testing, and corrective actions. The quality control stage is essential because it ensures that the finished product meets the requirements of the customer.
  4. Distribution: The distribution stage is where the finished product is packaged and shipped to the customer. This stage involves several steps, including packaging, labeling, and shipping. The distribution stage is essential because it ensures that the finished product is delivered to the customer in a timely and efficient manner.

Key roles in manufacturing process

  1. Production Manager: The production manager is responsible for overseeing the manufacturing process and ensuring that production targets are met. They are responsible for managing the production team, scheduling production runs, and monitoring the quality of the finished product.
  2. Production Team Members: The production team members are responsible for carrying out the tasks associated with the production stage of the manufacturing process. They may include machine operators, assemblers, and quality control inspectors.
  3. Quality Control Manager: The quality control manager is responsible for ensuring that the finished product meets the specified quality standards. They are responsible for developing quality control procedures, inspecting the finished product, and implementing corrective actions when necessary.
  4. Distribution Manager: The distribution manager is responsible for ensuring that the finished product is delivered to the customer in a timely and efficient manner. They are responsible for managing the distribution team, scheduling shipments, and monitoring delivery times.

Relevant for:

Automotive

Process management

10. RFP Process

Every business needs supplies from other businesses in order to be able to provide goods or services to its customers.

Request for Proposal (RFP) is a process used by organizations to solicit bids from suppliers or vendors for goods or services. An RFP is typically used when an organization needs to make a significant purchase or engage a new supplier.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main tasks in an RFP process

  1. Identify the Need: The first step in the RFP process is to identify the need for goods or services. This involves determining the specifications and requirements for the goods or services to be procured. The organization should clearly define its objectives and expectations for the project.
  2. Develop the RFP Document: Once the need has been identified, the next step is to develop the RFP document. The RFP document should provide detailed information about the project, including the scope of work, timeline, budget, and evaluation criteria.
  3. Distribute the RFP: After the RFP document has been developed, it should be distributed to potential suppliers or vendors. The organization may use various methods to distribute the RFP, such as posting it on its website, emailing it to potential suppliers, or using a procurement portal.
  4. Conduct Pre-Proposal Meetings: To clarify the scope of work and address any questions potential suppliers may have, pre-proposal meetings may be conducted. These meetings may be held in person or virtually, and they provide an opportunity for potential suppliers to ask questions and seek clarification about the project.
  5. Receive and Evaluate Proposals: Once the deadline for submitting proposals has passed, the organization will evaluate the proposals received. The evaluation process typically involves reviewing the proposals against the evaluation criteria outlined in the RFP document. The organization may also conduct site visits or interviews with potential suppliers to gather additional information.
  6. Select a Supplier: After evaluating all the proposals, the organization will select a supplier or vendors. The selection process may involve negotiations with the selected supplier to finalize the contract terms and conditions.
  7. Notify Unsuccessful Suppliers: Once a supplier has been selected, the organization should notify the unsuccessful suppliers of the decision. This is an important step to maintain transparency and build positive relationships with suppliers.
  8. Contract Management: After selecting a supplier, the organization should manage the contract to ensure that the supplier meets the agreed-upon terms and conditions. Contract management may involve monitoring the supplier's performance, conducting regular reviews, and resolving any issues that arise.

Roles involved in RFP process

  1. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for overseeing the entire RFP process, including developing the RFP document, setting timelines, distributing the RFP, and evaluating the proposals. The project manager ensures that the process is followed according to the organization's policies and procedures.
  2. Procurement Specialist: The procurement specialist is responsible for managing the procurement process, including developing the RFP document, distributing the RFP, and evaluating the proposals. The procurement specialist ensures that the process is fair and transparent, and that the selected supplier meets the organization's requirements.
  3. Subject Matter Experts: Subject matter experts provide technical expertise and advice on the goods or services being procured. They help to ensure that the RFP document includes accurate and detailed specifications and requirements.
  4. Legal Counsel: Legal counsel provides legal advice and guidance on the RFP process, including reviewing the RFP document and the selected supplier's contract. Legal counsel ensures that the organization's legal and regulatory requirements are met.
  5. Finance Department: The finance department provides financial expertise and advice on the RFP process, including evaluating the proposed costs and budgets. The finance department ensures that the selected supplier's costs are reasonable and within the organization's budget.
  6. Evaluation Committee: The evaluation committee is responsible for evaluating the proposals received from potential suppliers. The committee may include representatives from various departments within the organization, such as the project manager, procurement specialist, subject matter experts, legal counsel, and finance department.
  7. Selected Supplier: The selected supplier is responsible for providing the goods or services as outlined in the RFP document. The supplier must meet the agreed-upon terms and conditions, including the timeline, budget, and quality standards.

Relevant for:

Purchasing

Consulting

Work management

11. Procurement

Procurement is a process that involves the acquisition of goods, services, and works from external sources. It is an essential process for any organization that requires supplies, equipment, or services to run its operations. Procurement can be a complex process that involves several roles and responsibilities. In this article, we will discuss the procurement process and the roles involved in it.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Procurement Process

  1. Identifying the Need: The first step in the procurement process is to identify the need for a particular good, service, or work. This may arise from a variety of sources, such as an increase in demand, a shortage of existing inventory, or the need for new equipment.
  2. Conducting Market Research: Once the need is identified, the procurement team conducts market research to determine potential suppliers and their offerings. This involves evaluating factors such as price, quality, delivery time, and reliability.
  3. Preparing a Procurement Plan: Based on the market research, the procurement team prepares a procurement plan that outlines the requirements and specifications for the product or service.
  4. Developing Solicitation Documents: The procurement team develops solicitation documents such as a request for proposal (RFP) or request for quotation (RFQ) to invite bids from potential suppliers.
  5. Evaluating Bids: The procurement team evaluates the bids received from potential suppliers based on predefined evaluation criteria and selects the best one.
  6. Contracting: The procurement team creates a contract that outlines the terms and conditions of the agreement between the buyer and supplier.
  7. Monitoring and Managing Contracts: The procurement team monitors and manages the contract to ensure that the supplier is delivering the goods or services as per the terms of the agreement.

Roles in the Procurement Process

  1. Procurement Manager: The procurement manager is responsible for overseeing the procurement process and ensuring that all activities are carried out according to the organization's policies and procedures. They are also responsible for managing the procurement team and building relationships with suppliers.
  2. Procurement Officer: The procurement officer is responsible for carrying out the procurement process, including market research, soliciting bids, evaluating bids, and contracting.
  3. Contract Manager: The contract manager is responsible for managing the contract between the buyer and supplier, including monitoring performance, addressing issues, and renewing or terminating contracts.
  4. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for managing the project for which the goods or services are being procured. They work with the procurement team to ensure that the procurement process is aligned with the project's objectives and requirements.
  5. Supplier Relationship Manager: The supplier relationship manager is responsible for building and maintaining relationships with suppliers. They work with suppliers to ensure that they meet the organization's needs and expectations, and address any issues that arise during the procurement process.

Relevant for:

Purchasing

Consulting

Work management

12. Risk management / Risk assessment / Risk analysis

Managing risk is a basic human need. We insure our homes, our health, even our pets. For sure, in business, we want to know as many risks as possible and be prepared to deal with them.

Risk management is a process that helps organizations identify, assess, and mitigate potential risks that could impact their operations, reputation, or financial stability. This is not a one-time event but a continuous process that involves identifying and analyzing risks, developing strategies to mitigate them, and monitoring and adjusting those strategies as necessary.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key Elements of the Risk Management Process

  1. Risk Identification: This involves identifying potential risks that could impact an organization's operations, financial stability, reputation, or other key areas. Risks can come from a variety of sources, including internal operations, external events, regulatory changes, and other factors.
  2. Risk Assessment: Once potential risks have been identified, the next step is to assess the likelihood and impact of those risks. This involves evaluating the potential consequences of each risk and determining the probability that it will occur.
  3. Risk Mitigation: After risks have been identified and assessed, the next step is to develop strategies to mitigate those risks. This may involve implementing controls or procedures to minimize the likelihood of the risk occurring, transferring the risk to another party, or accepting the risk and developing contingency plans to address it if it does occur.
  4. Risk Monitoring and Adjustment: The final element of the risk management process is ongoing monitoring and adjustment of the risk management strategies. This involves regularly reviewing the risk management strategies to ensure they remain effective and adjusting them as necessary to address changes in the organization or external environment.

Roles involved in the Risk Management Process

  1. Senior Leadership: Senior leadership is responsible for establishing the overall risk management framework and ensuring that it aligns with the organization's strategic objectives. They are also responsible for providing the necessary resources and support to implement the risk management program effectively.
  2. Risk Management Team: The risk management team is responsible for implementing the risk management program, including identifying potential risks, assessing the likelihood and impact of those risks, developing strategies to mitigate those risks, and monitoring and adjusting those strategies as necessary.
  3. Department Managers: Department managers play a critical role in the risk management process by identifying potential risks within their departments and implementing strategies to mitigate those risks. They also provide feedback and input to the risk management team on the effectiveness of risk management strategies.
  4. Legal and Compliance: The legal and compliance team is responsible for ensuring that the organization is compliant with all relevant laws and regulations. They also identify potential legal and regulatory risks and work with the risk management team to develop strategies to mitigate those risks.
  5. IT: The IT department plays a critical role in the risk management process by identifying potential cybersecurity risks and implementing strategies to mitigate those risks. They also ensure that the organization's data is secure and that critical IT systems are available in the event of a disruption.
  6. Human Resources: The human resources department is responsible for identifying potential risks related to employee safety and well-being, such as workplace accidents, harassment, or discrimination. They work with the risk management team to implement strategies to mitigate those risks and ensure that employees are trained on safety protocols.
  7. External Consultants: Organizations may also engage external consultants, such as risk management experts, to provide additional expertise and support in the risk management process.

Relevant for:

GRC (Governance, Risk (Management) und Compliance)

Logistics

Quality management

13. Project Management

How is it possible not to lose sight of the big picture in a complex project with all the bodies and tasks involved?

Project management is the process of planning, organizing, and executing projects. It involves a series of steps designed to ensure that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of stakeholders.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

The five phases of the Project Management Process

  1. Initiation: The initiation phase involves defining the project's goals, objectives, scope, and stakeholders. This phase helps to establish the foundation for the project and provides a clear direction for the project team.
  2. Planning: The planning phase involves developing a comprehensive plan for the project, including timelines, budgets, and resources. This phase helps to identify potential risks and challenges and establish a framework for managing them.
  3. Execution: The execution phase involves carrying out the plan and completing the project. This phase includes tasks such as monitoring progress, managing resources, and communicating with stakeholders.
  4. Monitoring and Control: The monitoring and control phase involves tracking progress against the project plan and making adjustments as necessary. This phase helps to ensure that the project stays on track and meets its objectives.
  5. Closure: The closure phase involves wrapping up the project and evaluating its success. This phase includes tasks such as finalizing documentation, conducting post-project reviews, and celebrating the project team's success.

Key roles involved in the Project Management Process

  1. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for overseeing the entire project and ensuring that it is completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of stakeholders. They are responsible for developing the project plan, coordinating the project team, and communicating with stakeholders.
  2. Project Team Members: The project team members are responsible for completing the tasks assigned to them within the project plan. They may include individuals with technical expertise, such as software developers or engineers, as well as individuals with functional expertise, such as marketing or finance professionals.
  3. Stakeholders: Stakeholders are individuals or groups that have an interest in the project's outcome, such as customers, suppliers, or investors. They are often consulted throughout the project management process to ensure that their needs and requirements are being met.
  4. Project Sponsor: The project sponsor is responsible for providing the resources and support needed to complete the project. They may include senior executives or other leaders within the organization.

Relevant for:

IT

Automotive

Mechanical Engineering

Service Management

Consulting

Marketing

Work Management

14. Invoice workflow

How annoying it is when you're waiting to get paid and realize that you've forgotten to invoice a customer.

An invoice workflow is the process by which invoices are created, reviewed, approved, and paid. It is a component of any business's financial operations as it helps to ensure that invoices are processed accurately and efficiently, reducing the risk of errors, delays, and disputes.

Main steps of the Invoice Workflow

  1. Invoice creation: Invoices are created by the supplier and sent to the customer for payment. Invoices should include all relevant information, such as the invoice number, date, products or services provided, quantities, prices, and any applicable taxes.
  2. Invoice receipt and review: Once the invoice is received by the customer, it is reviewed to ensure that all information is accurate and that the products or services were provided as stated in the invoice. Any discrepancies or issues should be addressed with the supplier.
  3. Invoice approval: Once the invoice has been reviewed and confirmed as accurate, it must be approved for payment. This step may involve multiple levels of approval, depending on the organization's internal policies and procedures.
  4. Payment processing: Once the invoice has been approved, it is scheduled for payment. Payment can be made by various methods, such as checks, wire transfers, or electronic payments.
  5. Invoice tracking and reconciliation: Finally, the invoice must be tracked and reconciled to ensure that it has been paid and recorded correctly in the organization's financial records. This step involves verifying that the invoice has been paid in full and that it matches the payment details recorded in the organization's financial system.

Roles involved in an Invoice Workflow

  1. Supplier: A supplier is responsible for creating and sending invoices to the customer for payment. Invoices should include all relevant information, such as the invoice number, date, products or services provided, quantities, prices, and any applicable taxes.
  2. Customer: The customer receives the invoice from the supplier and is responsible for reviewing the invoice for accuracy and completeness. The customer may also be responsible for approving the invoice for payment and ensuring that it is paid on time.
  3. Accounts Payable Clerk: The accounts payable clerk is responsible for processing invoices, including entering them into the organization's financial system, reviewing and verifying invoices for accuracy, obtaining approvals, and scheduling payments.
  4. Manager or Approver: A manager or approver is responsible for reviewing and approving invoices before payment is made. This step may involve multiple levels of approval, depending on the organization's internal policies and procedures.
  5. Accounts Receivable Clerk: The accounts receivable clerk is responsible for tracking invoices and payments received from customers, reconciling accounts, and resolving any discrepancies or issues.
  6. Controller or CFO: The controller or CFO is responsible for overseeing the organization's financial operations, including invoice workflow. This includes ensuring that invoices are processed accurately and efficiently, managing cash flow, and complying with regulatory requirements.
  7. IT Staff: IT staff are responsible for managing and maintaining the organization's financial systems, including the software used for invoice processing and payment.

Relevant for:

Finance and Controlling

15. Marketing

Marketing is a company's mouthpiece for communication with its customers. And the Marketing Process is the process of identifying, anticipating, and satisfying customer needs and wants through the creation, promotion, and distribution of products and services. It is a critical business function that helps organizations generate revenue and grow their customer base.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Steps of the Marketing Process

  1. Market Research: The first step in the marketing process is to conduct market research. This involves gathering information about customer needs, preferences, and behaviors, as well as analyzing the competition and the broader market environment. Market research helps organizations identify opportunities and develop marketing strategies that are tailored to the needs of their target customers.
  2. Product Development: Once market research is complete, the organization can begin developing its products or services. This involves creating a product or service that meets the needs of the target market and is differentiated from the competition.
  3. Pricing Strategy: After the product is developed, the organization must determine its pricing strategy. This involves setting a price that reflects the value of the product or service and is competitive in the marketplace.
  4. Promotion: The promotion stage of the marketing process involves creating a marketing campaign that communicates the benefits of the product or service to the target audience. This can include advertising, public relations, sales promotions, and other marketing tactics.
  5. Distribution: The final stage of the marketing process is distribution, which involves getting the product or service to the customer. This can include direct sales, retail distribution, or e-commerce channels.

Roles in Marketing Process

  1. Marketing Manager: The Marketing Manager is responsible for overseeing the marketing department and developing and implementing marketing strategies that align with the organization's goals.
  2. Market Researcher: The Market Researcher is responsible for conducting research to gather information about customer needs, preferences, and behaviors, as well as analyzing the competition and the broader market environment.
  3. Product Manager: The Product Manager is responsible for developing and managing the organization's products or services, including setting pricing and product development strategies.
  4. Advertising Manager: The Advertising Manager is responsible for creating and implementing advertising campaigns that promote the organization's products or services to the target audience.
  5. Sales Manager: The Sales Manager is responsible for managing the sales team and developing strategies to increase sales revenue.

Relevant for:

Sales

Marketing

16. Content Marketing

Content marketing is the process of creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and engage a specific audience. It is a powerful tool for businesses to establish themselves as thought leaders, build brand awareness, and ultimately, drive profitable customer action.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Content Marketing Process

  1. Strategy: The first stage is developing a content marketing strategy. This involves identifying the target audience, defining the business objectives, and creating a plan to achieve those objectives through content.
  2. Creation: The second stage is content creation. This involves developing high-quality, relevant content that resonates with the target audience. The content can take many forms, such as blog posts, videos, social media posts, infographics, and more.
  3. Distribution: The third stage is content distribution. This involves sharing the content through various channels, such as social media, email, and other digital platforms. The goal is to get the content in front of the target audience in a way that is easy to consume and share.
  4. Measurement: The fourth stage is measuring the effectiveness of the content marketing efforts. This involves analyzing metrics such as website traffic, engagement, leads generated, and conversions. This data is used to refine the content marketing strategy and improve the performance of future campaigns.

Roles in Content Marketing

  1. Content Strategist: The content strategist is responsible for developing the content marketing strategy. They work closely with other team members to identify the target audience, business objectives, and metrics for success.
  2. Content Creator: The content creator is responsible for creating high-quality, engaging content that resonates with the target audience. They may work in various formats, such as writing, video production, design, or photography.
  3. Content Distributor: The content distributor is responsible for sharing the content through various channels, such as social media, email, and other digital platforms. They work to ensure that the content is easily discoverable and shareable.
  4. Analytics Expert: The analytics expert is responsible for measuring the effectiveness of the content marketing efforts. They analyze metrics such as website traffic, engagement, leads generated, and conversions, and use this data to refine the content marketing strategy and improve performance.

Relevant for:

Sales

Marketing

17. Application Process in IT

Applications are essential tools that organizations use to perform a wide range of tasks, from managing data to carrying out complex operations. However, the process of implementing an application in an organization is not always straightforward. It requires careful planning, coordination, and execution to ensure that the application is integrated into the organization seamlessly and efficiently.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Steps in the Application Process in IT

  1. Needs Assessment: The first step in the application process is to assess the needs of the organization. This involves identifying the tasks that the application will be used for, determining the features and functionalities required, and assessing the impact of the application on the organization's operations.
  2. Planning: Once the needs assessment is complete, the next step is to develop a plan for the application. This involves identifying the resources required, setting timelines, and defining the scope of the project. The plan should also include details on how the application will be integrated into the organization's existing systems and processes.
  3. Development: The development stage involves designing and building the application. This can be done in-house or outsourced to a third-party vendor. The development stage includes tasks such as programming, testing, and debugging.
  4. Deployment: Once the application has been developed and tested, it is time to deploy it in the organization. This involves installing the application, configuring it to meet the organization's needs, and ensuring that it is integrated with other systems and processes.
  5. Training: Once the application is deployed, it is essential to train users on how to use it effectively. This includes providing training materials and conducting training sessions to ensure that users understand how to use the application and its features.
  6. Maintenance: Finally, the application must be maintained to ensure that it remains functional and up-to-date. This involves monitoring the application for errors and bugs, performing regular updates and patches, and addressing any issues that arise.

Key roles in the Application Process

  1. Project Manager: The project manager is responsible for overseeing the application process and ensuring that it is completed on time, within budget, and to the desired quality standards. They are responsible for managing the development team, monitoring progress, and ensuring that the project meets the goals of the organization.
  2. Application Developers: The application developers are responsible for building the application. They may include software engineers, programmers, and designers.
  3. IT Support Team: The IT support team is responsible for maintaining the application and ensuring that it remains functional and up-to-date. They are responsible for monitoring the application, performing updates and patches, and addressing any issues that arise.
  4. End Users: The end users are the individuals who will be using the application. They are responsible for providing feedback on the application and using it effectively to perform their tasks.

Relevant for:

Software development

Process management

18. Demand management process

Imagine you have a product and nobody needs it.

Demand management is a process that involves managing and forecasting customer demand for products or services. The main objective of demand management is to ensure that an organization is able to meet customer demand while optimizing resources and maximizing profits.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Key steps of the Demand Management Process

  1. Forecasting demand: The first step in demand management is to forecast customer demand for products or services. This involves analyzing historical data, market trends, and other relevant factors to estimate future demand.
  2. Planning production: Based on the demand forecast, organizations can plan their production schedules and determine the resources required to meet customer demand. This includes ensuring that sufficient raw materials, labor, and equipment are available.
  3. Sales and marketing: The sales and marketing team plays a crucial role in demand management. They are responsible for promoting products or services, generating leads, and closing sales. They work closely with the demand forecasting team to ensure that they are meeting customer demand.
  4. Supply chain management: Supply chain management involves managing the flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers. It is an important aspect of demand management because it ensures that products are delivered on time and in the right quantity.
  5. Monitoring and reporting: The final step in demand management is to monitor and report on sales and customer demand. This involves analyzing sales data, tracking customer feedback, and making adjustments to sales and marketing strategies as needed.

Roles involved in Demand Management

  1. Demand planners: Demand planners are responsible for analyzing historical data, market trends, and other factors to forecast customer demand. They work closely with sales and marketing teams to ensure that they are meeting customer demand.
  2. Production planners: Production planners are responsible for planning production schedules and ensuring that sufficient resources are available to meet customer demand. They work closely with demand planners to ensure that production is aligned with customer demand.
  3. Sales and marketing teams: Sales and marketing teams are responsible for promoting products or services, generating leads, and closing sales. They work closely with demand planners to ensure that they are meeting customer demand.
  4. Supply chain managers: Supply chain managers are responsible for managing the flow of goods and services from suppliers to customers. They work closely with production planners to ensure that products are delivered on time and in the right quantity.
  5. Customer service representatives: Customer service representatives are responsible for addressing customer concerns and providing support. They work closely with sales and marketing teams to ensure that customers are satisfied with products or services.

Relevant for:

Consulting

19. Cost management

A benefit for every household: Cost management or the good old household diary.

Cost management is the process of planning, controlling, and monitoring the expenses associated with a business or project. It is a function that helps organizations maintain financial stability and profitability.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps in the Cost Management Process

  1. Planning: The first step in the cost management process is planning. This involves developing a cost management plan that outlines the budget, cost estimates, and cost control measures for the project or business.
  2. Estimating: Once the cost management plan is developed, the next step is to estimate the costs associated with the project or business. This involves identifying all the expenses, including labor, materials, equipment, and overhead, and determining the cost for each item.
  3. Budgeting: After the costs are estimated, the next step is to develop a budget that allocates the available resources to various activities and expenses. This helps ensure that the project or business stays within the allocated budget.
  4. Monitoring: The monitoring stage of the cost management process involves tracking the actual expenses against the budget and identifying any variances. This helps identify areas where costs can be reduced or managed more effectively.
  5. Controlling: The final stage of the cost management process is controlling. This involves implementing cost control measures to ensure that the project or business stays within the allocated budget. This can include implementing cost-saving measures, renegotiating contracts, or adjusting the scope of the project.

Roles in Cost Management

  1. Cost Accountant: The Cost Accountant is responsible for tracking and analyzing costs associated with a project or business. They develop cost estimates, monitor actual expenses, and identify areas where costs can be reduced.
  2. Financial Analyst: The Financial Analyst is responsible for analyzing financial data and developing financial forecasts for the project or business. They help identify areas where costs can be reduced and recommend cost-saving measures.
  3. Project Manager: The Project Manager is responsible for overseeing the project and ensuring that it stays within the allocated budget. They work with the Cost Accountant and Financial Analyst to develop the cost management plan and implement cost control measures.
  4. Procurement Manager: The Procurement Manager is responsible for purchasing goods and services for the project or business. They work with vendors to negotiate contracts and ensure that the project stays within the allocated budget.
  5. Executive Management: Executive Management is responsible for providing the overall direction and support for the cost management process. They help develop the cost management plan and provide the resources necessary to implement cost control measures.

Relevant for:

Logistics

Finance and Controlling

20. Approval

Approval is a process in many organizations that involves reviewing and authorizing requests, documents, and decisions. The approval process typically includes several stages and roles that work together to ensure that requests are properly evaluated and authorized.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Approval Process

  1. Request: The first stage in the approval process is the request stage. This involves submitting a request or document for review and approval. The request could be for a purchase, a project, or a decision.
  2. Review: The second stage in the approval process is the review stage. This involves evaluating the request or document to ensure that it aligns with the organization's policies and goals. The review may involve multiple individuals or departments depending on the nature of the request.
  3. Authorization: The third stage in the approval process is the authorization stage. This involves authorizing the request or document for implementation. Authorization may require the signature or approval of one or more individuals, depending on the nature of the request.
  4. Implementation: The final stage in the approval process is the implementation stage. This involves carrying out the request or decision that has been authorized.

Roles in Approval Process

  1. Requester: The Requester is responsible for submitting a request for review and approval. They may be an employee, a department, or an external party.
  2. Reviewer: The Reviewer is responsible for evaluating the request or document to ensure that it aligns with the organization's policies and goals. Reviewers may include managers, supervisors, or subject matter experts.
  3. Approver: The Approver is responsible for authorizing the request or document for implementation. Approvers may include senior management, executives, or a designated individual with the authority to make decisions.
  4. Implementer: The Implementer is responsible for carrying out the request or decision that has been authorized. Implementers may include employees, contractors, or external parties.

Relevant for:

Quality management

Process management

21. DevOps

DevOps is a methodology that combines development (Dev) and operations (Ops) to streamline software delivery processes and improve the quality of software products. It is a cultural shift that emphasizes collaboration, automation, and continuous delivery.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the DevOps Process

  1. Plan: The first stage in the DevOps process is the planning stage. This involves defining the project scope, goals, and requirements. It also involves creating a plan for the software development process.
  2. Develop: The second stage in the DevOps process is the development stage. This involves building and coding the software product. Developers work to create and test software code that meets the requirements set forth in the planning stage.
  3. Test: The third stage in the DevOps process is the testing stage. This involves testing the software product to ensure that it is functional, reliable, and meets the requirements set forth in the planning stage. Testing may include automated testing, manual testing, and user acceptance testing.
  4. Deploy: The fourth stage in the DevOps process is the deployment stage. This involves deploying the software product to the production environment. Deployment may involve a series of automated steps to ensure that the software is deployed in a consistent and reliable manner.
  5. Operate: The final stage in the DevOps process is the operation stage. This involves operating and maintaining the software product in the production environment. This stage includes monitoring, troubleshooting, and updating the software product as needed.

Roles in DevOps

  1. Developer: The Developer is responsible for writing and testing software code that meets the requirements set forth in the planning stage.
  2. Tester: The Tester is responsible for testing the software product to ensure that it is functional, reliable, and meets the requirements set forth in the planning stage.
  3. Operations Engineer: The Operations Engineer is responsible for deploying the software product to the production environment and maintaining it in the operation stage.
  4. Security Engineer: The Security Engineer is responsible for ensuring that the software product is secure and meets the organization's security standards.
  5. Product Owner: The Product Owner is responsible for defining the project scope, goals, and requirements. They work closely with the development team to ensure that the software product meets the organization's needs.

Relevant for:

Software development

22. Performance review

A performance review is a process of evaluating an employee's job performance over a specific period of time. It is an important tool for employers to provide feedback, identify areas for improvement, and recognize employee accomplishments.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main Steps of the Performance Review Process

  1. Setting goals and expectations: The first stage is setting goals and expectations. This involves establishing clear job expectations and setting goals that align with the employee's role and the organization's objectives.
  2. Performance measurement: The second stage is measuring performance. This involves collecting and analyzing data related to the employee's job performance, such as attendance, productivity, and quality of work.
  3. Feedback and discussion: The third stage is providing feedback and discussing the employee's performance. This involves communicating the results of the performance measurement to the employee, discussing areas for improvement, and recognizing achievements.
  4. Development planning: The fourth stage is development planning. This involves identifying specific areas for improvement and developing a plan to help the employee improve their performance.

Roles in Performance Review

  1. Employee: The employee is responsible for meeting job expectations and performing to the best of their abilities. They are also responsible for receiving feedback, recognizing areas for improvement, and working with their manager to develop a plan for improvement.
  2. Manager: The manager is responsible for setting job expectations, measuring performance, providing feedback, and developing a plan for improvement. They are also responsible for recognizing employee accomplishments and identifying opportunities for growth and development.
  3. Human resources: Human resources is responsible for establishing the performance review process, providing support and guidance to managers and employees, and ensuring that the process is fair and consistent across the organization.
  4. Executive leadership: Executive leadership is responsible for setting the overall strategy and objectives of the organization, which drive the performance expectations for employees. They also provide support and guidance to managers and human resources to ensure that the performance review process aligns with the organization's goals and values.

Relevant for:

Work management

HR

23. Customer onboarding

Customer onboarding is the process of familiarizing new customers with a company's products or services, guiding them through the purchase process, and setting them up for success. It is a critical stage in the customer journey, as it sets the tone for the entire customer relationship.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Customer Onboarding Process

  1. Pre-onboarding: The first stage is pre-onboarding. This involves communicating with the customer before their purchase to provide information about the company's products or services, answer questions, and address any concerns.
  2. Welcome and orientation: The second stage is welcome and orientation. This involves welcoming the customer, introducing them to the company's products or services, and providing guidance on how to get started.
  3. Education and training: The third stage is education and training. This involves providing the customer with information and resources to help them use the product or service effectively, such as tutorials, videos, and documentation.
  4. Ongoing support: The fourth stage is ongoing support. This involves providing the customer with ongoing support and assistance, such as troubleshooting, answering questions, and addressing issues that arise.

Roles in Customer Onboarding

  1. Customer Success Manager: The customer success manager is responsible for overseeing the customer onboarding process, ensuring that the customer is set up for success, and addressing any issues that arise.
  2. Sales representative: The sales representative is responsible for communicating with the customer before their purchase, providing information about the company's products or services, and answering questions.
  3. Support team: The support team is responsible for providing ongoing support and assistance to the customer, such as troubleshooting, answering questions, and addressing issues that arise.
  4. Product specialist: The product specialist is responsible for providing education and training to the customer, such as tutorials, videos, and documentation.

Relevant for:

Service Management

24. Customer complaint management

Customer complaints are a part of every business. No matter how well an organization is run, there will be times when customers will have complaints. Therefore, it is important for organizations to have a well-defined process in place to manage customer complaints effectively.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of Customer Complaint Management Process

Step 1: Receiving the Complaint

The first step in customer complaint management is receiving the complaint. The complaint can be received through various channels, such as email, phone, chat, social media, or in person.

Step 2: Recording the Complaint

Once the complaint is received, it needs to be recorded. This involves capturing the details of the complaint, such as the customer's name, contact information, and the nature of the complaint.

Step 3: Investigating the Complaint

After the complaint has been recorded, it needs to be investigated to determine the cause of the issue. This involves collecting more information about the complaint, such as the time and date of the incident, the people involved, and any other relevant details.

Step 4: Responding to the Complaint

Once the investigation is complete, the organization needs to respond to the complaint. The response should be timely and address the customer's concerns. The response can be in the form of an apology, an explanation of what happened, and a resolution to the complaint.

Step 5: Monitoring the Complaint

Roles Involved in the Customer Complaint Management Process

  1. Customer Service Representatives

    Customer service representatives are the frontline employees who receive and record customer complaints. They are responsible for capturing the details of the complaint accurately and ensuring that the complaint is escalated to the appropriate department.

  2. Investigation Team

    The investigation team is responsible for investigating the complaint to determine the cause of the issue. They collect more information about the complaint, such as the time and date of the incident, the people involved, and any other relevant details.

  3. Customer Relationship Manager

    The customer relationship manager is responsible for managing the customer relationship and ensuring that the customer is satisfied with the resolution. They follow up with the customer to ensure that the issue has been resolved to their satisfaction.

  4. Quality Control Team

    The quality control team is responsible for monitoring the customer complaint management process to ensure that it is effective. They analyze customer feedback and identify areas for improvement in the process.

Relevant for:

Service Management

25. Incident Reporting

Nobody is perfect and incidents happen. So Incident reporting is a necessary process in any organization. It refers to the procedure of documenting any unexpected or unplanned event that occurs within an organization. Incidents can range from workplace accidents, equipment failure, software errors, security breaches, or any other event that disrupts normal operations.

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

IMAGE

/* IMAGE here */

Main steps of the Incident Reporting Process

  1. Incident Identification: The first step in the incident reporting process is to identify and document the incident. The incident can be reported via email, phone call, or any other communication method specified by the organization.
  2. Incident Categorization: The next step is to categorize the incident based on its severity, impact, and urgency. This helps prioritize the incident and allocate resources to manage it effectively.
  3. Incident Analysis: The incident manager and IT team analyze the incident to determine the root cause and the impact it had on the organization.
  4. Incident Response: Based on the incident analysis, the incident manager and IT team take necessary corrective actions to address the incident and prevent it from happening again in the future.
  5. Incident Closure: Once the incident has been resolved, it is closed, and a report is generated. The report includes details about the incident, the actions taken to address it, and recommendations to prevent similar incidents in the future.

Roles Involved in Incident Reporting Process

  1. Incident Reporter: The first role in the incident reporting process is the incident reporter. This can be any employee or member of the organization who witnesses or experiences an incident. It is their responsibility to report the incident to the appropriate personnel or department.
  2. Incident Manager: The incident manager is responsible for overseeing the entire incident reporting process. They analyze the incident reports to determine the cause of the incident, the impact it had on the organization, and identify corrective actions to prevent it from happening again in the future.
  3. IT Team: In the case of IT-related incidents, the IT team is responsible for managing the incident. They analyze the incident to determine the root cause and take necessary corrective actions.
  4. Legal Team: In some cases, an incident may have legal implications. In such cases, the legal team is responsible for analyzing the incident and determining if the organization is at risk of any legal action.

Relevant for:

IT

Service

Start now

With this selection of common processes, you can start into a new era of your company. Once you realize how much easier well-structured and automated processes can make the workflows in your company, you can use helping apps to build the processes and workflows that are relevant to you and make your organization even more attractive to employees and customers.

Call to action

Automate complex Business Processes and Workflows with Simplicity

Mapping single Jira workflows won't necessarily go far enough. Flower Workflow Automation adds the strategic layer to your business process management.

Unlock the full power of Jira by aligning and streamlining your BPMN processes and workflows directly with your team: Every business process turns into an automated workflow by creating a Jira issue for each business process activity.


START YOUR FREE FLOWER TRIAL TODAY!